Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut

Product Classification: Games

Title: Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut

Release Date: 30th April 2013

Genre: Psychological horror, open world

Rating: PG-15

Developer: Access Games

Publisher: NA Ignition Entertainment, JP Marvelous Entertainment, Rising Star Games

Designer: Hidetaka “SWERY” Suehiro

Platform: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3

Mode: Single-player

Media: DVD, Blu-ray Disc

Languages: English (International)

Description:
‘Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut’ brings you horror using nothing more than psychological means. The game was developed by Access Games and is compatible with both the PS3 and Xbox 360. It was then published by Ignition Entertainment for the North American market. There are so many unique innovations that are associated with the franchise and the latest installation does not disappoint in that respect. For example the open world non-linear approach to game play is still prevalent. There is something almost comic about the narrative while at the same time it remains firmly rooted in the tradition of horror stories.

Deadly Premonition Game Highlights

‘Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut’ is able to implement a free-roaming storyline which is entirely in keeping with the open game genre. All the characters in the game have individualized schedules and that customization is one of the important attractions for players regardless of whether they are experienced or not. The other interesting thing about the franchise is that it thrives on dividing opinion. Thus some people believe that the treatment of the subject matter is an innovative thing while others are outraged at the perceived desecration of time-honored traditions.

We come in the middle of the road. Although ‘Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut’ is unconventional in purely gaming terms, there is something attractive about a narrative that is not all about shoot-outs. The player is allowed to roam in Greenvale, a creepy town. Consequently the player is expected to participate in a number of mandatory activities which contribute to the overall storyline. Agent York is the main character and is controlled using the over-the-shoulder perspective. Otherwise he can wander freely.

It seems as if the player is wandering with Agent York as he collects weapon, inventory as well as getting involved in various melees. The reward for killing enemies and solving quests is monetary but there are also penalties for failing to undertake certain tasks. The agent can explore the landscape on foot or travel with speed. Agent York must strive to maintain the vehicles that he uses. Moreover the agent needs food and sleep on a regular basis. There are penalties for failing to maintain his hygiene.
‘Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut’ is divided into a day and night schedule. A single game will take 8 hours. However there are frequent skips in time. By smoking cigarettes Agent York can accelerate the passage of time. There are many inhabitants of the town with their own schedules. They tend to go about their business regardless of Agent York. However the protagonist can trail them or spy on them. However if the agent engages them at the right time and place, they may help him to perform side quests which in turn help him to garner even more rewards. The weather is another distraction because it changes unpredictably and can reduce the effectiveness of the missions.

Verdict:
‘Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut’ is a surreal game. It goes away from many of the clichés associated with the genre. Therefore you should add it to your collection, if only to add diversity to your entertainment.

more info az eds review

Ed
    About Ed Stanley

    I am a bit of a 'junkie' when it comes to any electronics. Everything that's new and old. Having been around the stuff all my life since our family has had a shop for three generations. I aim to make each review informative and entertaining. Any thoughts - please make a comment. Anything you want me to review, please send me an email or comment below.

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